Heirloom Project

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ National Trust for Scotland Online Book https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/margaretalexander
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/margaretalexander

    Margaret Alexander

    | 28 Aug 2014

     

    It’s so hard to choose a single place or object, but after a lot of thought I would choose Pompeo Batoni's magnificent portrait of Colonel William Gordon at Fyvie castle. Showing a tartan clad Scottish soldier in full Highland dress standing proudly before Rome, it must be one of the most remarkable portraits of the 18th Century. This in 1766, only 20 years after Culloden, when the wearing of tartan was still forbidden! Such self confidence, not to say arrogance, deserves to be an heirloom.

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Heirloom Project

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ National Trust for Scotland Online Book https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/susanbain
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/susanbain

    Susan Bain

    | 28 Aug 2014

     

    To sit on the burial mound on Pabbay on a fine summers day in the long grass with a glimpse of white sand and turquoise sea is a privilege.  The carved stones and in particular the Pictish carved stone links you to a previous age we can barely imagine.  It is a reminder of the thousands of people who have lived and died on this little island and of those who sought out this isolation to contemplate their faith.   The Pabbay stone is probably 7th century and one of only five in the whole of the Hebrides.  The meaning of the symbols is still unknown and the subject of much academical research and debate.  This unknown quality is also an attraction, a mystery to contemplate as you listen to the wind and bird calls on this now deserted island.  Passing on such a wild place with the cultural remains in situ is what I want to do.

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