Heirloom Project

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ National Trust for Scotland Online Book https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/jonathanissacs
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/jonathanissacs

    Jonathan Issacs

    | 29 Aug 2014

     

    I have chosen a property more than an Heirloom. That property is Culzean Castle. As well as beautiful gardens and scenery which give off a peaceful aura the castle itself is interesting. As you first enter the castle you are greeted by a room full of swords on the walls. In the main part is the grand spiral carpeted staircase. I love the picture at the top of the staircase of the woman whose gaze follows you everywhere you go. Down near the kitchen I love the wall with all the servant's bells. There is much information and history (and creepiness !) to this castle.

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Heirloom Project

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ National Trust for Scotland Online Book https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/gavinjohnston
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/gavinjohnston

    Gavin Johnston

    | 29 Aug 2014

     

    When I think of NTS properties my mind immediately turns to the Aberdeenshire castles. Located 20 miles south west of Inverurie, found amongst the picturesque rolling hills, Craigievar Castle has a Great Tower which dates from 1626. The building intriguingly resembles a fairytale castle with the simplicity of the lower towers contrasting with the turrets, the cupolas, and corbelling, which embellish the roofline. Although I worked for Grampian Region in the 1970's it was not until 2012, after the castle reopened following its two year harling renewal, that I took the opportunity to visit my final Aberdeenshire castle. The Forbes-Semphill family lived in the castle until 1963 in essentially its original condition without running water and electricity. Today it remains virtually as unspoiled as it was over fifty years ago. It is somewhat awe inspiring to consider the lugging of bathwater up steep, spiral stone staircases by the very few domestic staff in the 1960's. The water required to be heated close to the bath. It is the ideal choice for a "national heirloom" if such a subjective accolade was to exist, as it is the perfect Scottish heritage castle. It was built in the style of a chieftain's Scottish keep, which was the defensive architectural style used by Scottish landowners for hundreds of years before the 17th century. This pink harled edifice would have been safe from attack in the vulnerable times centuries ago. Today it is a striking feature from the public highway within its parkland setting. In terms of its historic and architectural importance in a national context Craigievar Castle is Grade A Listed. As a national treasure it is therefore an "heirloom" of significance.

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