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Messages from the Rest of World

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ Online Book for Brother James Kimpton https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/hildebardelllongtermsupporter
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/hildebardelllongtermsupporter

    Hilde Bardell, long-term supporter

    UK | 15 Nov 2017

     

    Our first visit to RTU was in 1991, as part of one of the first Traidcraft 'People to People' tours to India. Brother James talked to us about his work, and arranged for us to visit Anbu Illam (the only Children's Village at the time), the primary school, (no St Peter's High school yet), a balwadi, the clinic, and the feeding and house-building programmes. At that time Brother had also set up the weaving sheds, and Traidcraft bought tea towels from him. RTU also had a Batik project, where handicapped adults produced beautifully designed linen, tablecloths, bedspreads, and Brother himself designed wall hangings with an Indian/Christian theme. We bought many of them and we and family and friends have them and treasure them still. Although the visit was just for one day, Brother James and the children touched our hearts and we haven't been the same since! We have been blessed to be able to return five times for longer visits, always being made very welcome, and have been able to support RTU and watch it grow to the amazing transformational project it is now. Many of you will know the plaque on the wall at the RTU campus: "Much of what we do is like planting trees under which we may never sit, but plant we must". Well, even what we see now is only the tip of the iceberg - all those lives changed, (Indian and Western!) are seeds sown for for the trees that grow now and provide life and healing for innumerable families, and for those trees yet to grow in the years to come. The influence of meeting unconditional love at RTU will spread in ways we will never know in this life. The small chapel Brother James used was where the offices are now on the RTU campus, and after visiting it on that first trip, I spoke to Br James about his faith. He told me then that he couldn't do anything without the sustenance of his faith in Jesus and grace received in Word and Sacrament. That too, left an indelible mark in me, which even now helps me keep my priorities right. Thank you Brother James, for being an ordinary man who allowed yourself to be made quite extraordinary by the life of Christ in you, and so allowing Christ to reach us all. Hilde Bardell

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Messages from the Rest of World

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ Online Book for Brother James Kimpton https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/rosburnipformallyleighwhoservedontheexperienceexchangeprogrammein20062007inmadurai
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/rosburnipformallyleighwhoservedontheexperienceexchangeprogrammein20062007inmadurai

    Ros Burnip, formally Leigh, who served on the Experience Exchange Programme in 2006/2007 in Madurai

    UK | 16 Nov 2017

     

    MEMORIES OF BROTHER JAMES KIMPTON I worked at the Arulagam Hostel for Women like other Experience Exchange Programme volunteers before and since. In itself, it was an amazing experience working with severely disadvantaged women and girls who, despite everything, were so cheerful and spunky. It was whilst I was there that I came across Brother James and his compassionate and caring work; it happened in two ways. Firstly many of the women who came to Arulagam had arrived as a result of hard times through violent relationships, death of a partner, desertion or other means. Many came with small children whom they could no longer support. Their small children went to nursery in Arulagam but when older went up to RTU to school at one of the villages and became part of one of the families there, gaining a chance of a new life. Several of the Arulagam women also went to train as foster mothers. This meant that they could keep one or even two of their children with them whilst also caring for other youngsters in RTU's care. Brother James made sure his foster mothers had training and support giving status, confidence and new hope to those women. My first meeting with Brother James himself was when visiting some of those former Arulagam women now living as foster mothers and I was so struck by the gently caring way that he related to people who had experienced very damaging situations yet he was never sentimental but clear that to give those most in need dignity, training, education and health care was the best way to help them rebuild their lives. The other two visits I made to RTU were taking women who had not long given birth outside a caring relationship to leave their babies in the care of RTU to be looked after in a family setting prior to adoption. To sit next to a woman giving up her new baby is a heart-breaking experience but, due to the training given to staff by Brother James, it was done humanely and lovingly. It was a privilege then to eat and talk about it afterwards to Brother when, as was his usual custom, he ate with everyone and the same simple food as everyone. There is so much that other world leaders, who claim status, privilege and power for themselves will little regard for the poor, could learn from this gently caring and discerning man - strong in the ways that matter, wise about what is important and brave enough to carry out such life-changing work. He made a huge impression on me, a man who lived and breathed as a true follower of Christ. Below is a picture of Kastari's baby, who she gave up for adoption, being put in a sari as a cradle, and the foster mother at RTU who looked after her. Ros Burnip

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