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  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ Online Book for Brother James Kimpton https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/stevewood
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/stevewood

    Steve Wood

    United Kingdom | 23 Apr 2018

     

    It wasn't until my third visit to RTU in 2014 that I spent time with Brother on a regular basis. It was our shared experience of back pain that allowed us to sit outside his office and compare ailments most mornings before I went off with Ray and John to teach the girls of the eleventh standard some English. His determination to refuse any help not available to the locals was not surprising to me. He did say that some days he wished he could somehow simply remove the sciatic nerve which was causing him so much discomfort. He then burst out laughing at how ridiculous the idea was. This then made me laugh, which caused me pain. He would laugh some more which would cause him pain. Then I would laugh at him and he'd laugh at me and we'd sit there in pain, but laughing. Steve Wood Supporter and volunteer

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Messages from the Rest of World

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ Online Book for Brother James Kimpton https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/mikedonlevyformerpupilofbrotherjamesatstpetersschoolbournemouth
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/mikedonlevyformerpupilofbrotherjamesatstpetersschoolbournemouth

    Mike Donlevy, former pupil of Brother James at St Peter's School, Bournemouth

    UK | 30 Apr 2018

     

    I first knew Brother James Kimpton in 1947 - my first teacher - over 70 years ago at St Peter’s School in Bournemouth. I learned that in later years he went to Sri Lanka to teach but was then moved to India when all foreign workers were expelled from the country. He was so appalled at the conditions in India that he ceased teaching and dedicated his life to improving the lives of the people in the State of Tamil Nadu and so Reaching the Unreached was born. So - many thanks to Sri Lanka! I visited Brother James and Father Antony seven years ago and had many wonderful experiences. The work initiated and achieved by Brother James was simply incredible. I could write at length about all I saw and learned but will just remind myself of some of the care provided by Brother James - the care given to the 1000 children inside the RTU Children's Villages, the care given outside in the remote villages, the protection of villagers from money lenders and the level of healthcare facilities provided: - RTU built Children’s Villages for young abandoned, rejected, or orphaned children and hostels for the teenagers – all cared for in groups of 6 or 8 by foster mothers who themselves may have been deserted or widowed. All children are educated at the RTU schools to secondary level before funding them onto external higher education or professional courses, such as Nursing, Pharmacy, Teacher Training or Engineering. - RTU helps the desperately poor in their own remote villages by building houses for families with drainage and electricity facilities. Many hundred houses have been built. We at St Michael’s Church have raised over £80,000 to date and most of this money has been donated to replace the palm leaf and mud hovels that very many villagers live in. - RTU helps villagers escape from poverty by getting rid of unscrupulous money lenders who charge them such a high level of interest on loans to buy items essential that they are never able to repay the loan. - RTU has established several self-operating groups of village women who meet weekly and have been taught to save regular small amounts. They deposit the money in their own bank account which has been set up in their name by RTU and can borrow money from this bank for emergency loans and to start their own businesses.This empowering of women has taught them financial control and has removed the need for them to use money lenders when buying items essential for their existence. - RTU has also established health care facilities both within and outside RTU. Within RTU, all children have a medical check-up twice a year. There are many children who are HIV positive and there are nurses on duty day and night. An HIV consultant visits regularly. There is a Health Clinic every morning, open to remote villagers giving ante-natal care and child health care services, and a Doctor attends from the local hospital. - RTU operates a Mobile Clinic outside the RTU village which visits the remote villages for examinations and injections and an Outreach Department conducts HIV Awareness programmes. and so on…… I hadn’t seen Brother James for very many years but, at St Michael’s Church in Worthing, we became aware of his work at RTU and decided that it was a charity in which the parish could be actively involved. We knew of course that it was a wonderful cause to support - helping the poorest of the poor in Southern India living in unspeakable conditions - and, most importantly, we knew that any money collected would go straight to the charity in India. Over the years we have been kept up to date by the receipt of regular detailed quarterly newsletters showing us clearly how our money was being spent. These newsletters are still being received regularly without fail. The memory I will never forget is of the ever-present smiles on the faces of the hundreds of children I saw or spoke to - children who had often been orphaned or abandoned (particularly girl babies) and who might be infected by HIV. To me, that said it all to me about Brother James – seeing him through the eyes and smiles of the children and through the love and peace bestowed on the Unreached. I am proud to have met this wonderful man. May he Rest in Peace. Mike Donlevy, Pupil at St Peters School Bournemouth 1947 - 1959 and the parishioners of St Michael’s Church in Worthing

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