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Heirloom Project

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ National Trust for Scotland Online Book https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/fionafisher
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/NationalTrustScotland/Contributions/Find/HeirloomProject/fionafisher

    Fiona Fisher

    Dollar, UK | 11 Oct 2014

     

    It is too difficult to choose one heirloom, even discounting objects and artefacts (which are a different question). Like most other people, I have selected places. To narrow what would otherwise be an impossibly large field of candidate places, I am focussing on what is local and special to me, places that I want to keep safe and share with friends and family. One of the things that is excellent about the National Trust for Scotland is that it encompasses all the heritage, natural, designed, built and cultural. Local places that I love to take visitors to include two special places, both managed by NTS. The first is a built and cultural site; the second, mainly natural. They both happen to be free of charge. Culross is a gem of a 17th Century village and Royal Burgh. Situated on the Firth of Forth, it has a long history of trade. It is also associated with the Bruce family who resided at Culross Palace with its delightful walled garden. The present Abbey dates from the 13th C, but is believed to be on the site of a Pictish church. Above all, it is the narrow winding streets and white-washed stone cottages with pantiled roofs and crow-stepped gables that make Culross so special. NTS rescued the charming 17th century vernacular architecture in their Little Houses Scheme in the 1970s. Dollar Glen is a dramatic wooded pair of glens leading up to Castle Campbell, a nature reserve. The 15th C tower house, previously know as Castle Gloume, sits on a rocky hill between the deeply cut Burns of Care and Sorrow. The slopes are covered in oak woodland, carpeted in bluebells in the spring and rare wild flora and are home to woodpeckers, tree creepers and red squirrels. The first is perfect for a donder about, preferably with a cup of tea and a bun, the second is more strenuous, not suited to people with restricted mobility or for small children. Cups of tea are also available at the Castle (Historic Scotland will provide opening details) and in the town below.

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