Page of

Share this page

Share this page

Share this page

Share this page

A tribute to Captain Thomas Noel Harris by Ivar Hellberg

Date added: 16 Mar 2015

394

Ivar Hellberg

Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Celebrations/FindTribute/DescendantsStories/ivarhellberg
Dear Family and Friends, As a way remembering those that fought at Waterloo in June 1815 including $personFirstName$, we have created a page within the $bookTitle$ book. Please contribute by adding your thoughts, messages, photographs or even videos about this soldier. Add your insight or expertise to help build and lock-in our knowledge about this person, simply go to: $findPersonLink$ and make your contribution too. Thank you,

Images: Tom Harris pre Waterloo and his sword

From the Illustrated Times March 1860
“Death of another Waterloo Hero”
“Another Waterloo officer has been removed by death, making the fifth recorded within the last four weeks. Col. Sir Thomas Noel Harris, KH, died at his seat in Kent, on Friday last. The deceased officer was born in 1785, and was son of the late Rev Hamlyn Harris, Rector of Whitehall, Rutlandshire. The gallant Colonel served in the campaigns of 1811, 1812 and 1813 in the Peninsula, during which he was in constant active service. In the autumn of the latter year he served with the allied armies in Germany and France, up to the surrender of Paris in 1814, and was present at the battles of Grossbergen and Dennewitz, and the battles of Leipzig of 16th, 17th,18th and 19th October 1813. He passed the Rhine with the army under Marshall Blucher in January 1814 and was present at all the battles and engagements up to the capitulation of Paris.

The late Sir Thomas Harris served in the campaign of 1815 and was present at Quatre Brass and Waterloo, at which last battle he lost a limb (arm) and was otherwise severely wounded (musket ball in the side), and had two horses shot under him*. For his military services he was made a Knight of the Royal Hanoverian Order in 1830, and was knighted in 1841. He had received the silver war medal and four clasps for his services in the Peninsula, and had received also the Order of Military Merit of Prussia, and the Orders of St Anne and St Vladimir of Russia, for service before the enemy. He for some years held the military appointment of Chief Magistrate at Gibraltar and was one of the grooms of Her Majesty’s Privy Chamber. He attained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army in February 1823, and retired on half-pay in 1830”

* Although left for dead on the battle field, he was found the following morning by a friend and managed to survive and live on until 1860.

Submitted by Ivar Hellberg ( 5x great grandson)

Upload your Story as a PDF as well as text and images about this Soldier

Previous Page Next

A tribute to Captain Thomas Noel Harris by Ivar Hellberg

Date added: 25 Apr 2015

395

Ivar Hellberg

Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Celebrations/FindTribute/DescendantsStories/ivarhellberg1
Dear Family and Friends, As a way remembering those that fought at Waterloo in June 1815 including $personFirstName$, we have created a page within the $bookTitle$ book. Please contribute by adding your thoughts, messages, photographs or even videos about this soldier. Add your insight or expertise to help build and lock-in our knowledge about this person, simply go to: $findPersonLink$ and make your contribution too. Thank you,

Images: Tom Harris's Coatee after the battle and after his arm amputation

Captain Thomas Noel Harris 1783 – 1860 Brigade Major, 6th CavalryBrigadeThomas joined the Army aged 17 in 1800 andserved in Ireland, Portugal, Spain and Germany.In April 1815 he was appointed Brigade Major to Maj Gen Sir Hussey Vivianand the 6th Cavalry Brigade, and attended the Duchess of Richmond’sball on 15 June. In the late afternoonof 18 June, Vivian’s cavalry brigade made the final charge of the day, betweenHougoumont and La Haye Sante, after the repulse of the Imperial Guard. Thomas was wounded in the chest by a musketball and had his right arm shattered. Hewas found the next day lying in the mud of Waterloo by his first cousin, LtJohn Clement Wallington (1780 – 1872) of the 10thHussars, whom he had teased about the forthcoming baptism of fire (Wallingtonhad only joined the 10th Hussars in November 1814) by sprinkling himwith water when he found him sleeping on the ground the night before thebattle. When he was taken to Hougoumontto have his arm amputated, he is said to have told the surgeon that ‘he andthat gentleman (ie his arm) had been so long acquainted that he should like toshake hands once more before parting’.He made a remarkable recovery from the lossof his arm, writing with his left hand within a month and riding and driving acarriage one handedly for the rest of his life.A nine year old grandson (Hamlyn Lavicount Harris), visiting him in1854, was most impressed ‘by the way in which he flourished the carving knifeas he sliced, with his left hand, the big sirloin which the butler held steadywith the fork’. He remained with the Army, serving inCanada and Ireland until he retired in 1834.He died in 1860 as Lt Col Sir Thomas Noel Harris, and there is amemorial to him in St Laurence Church, Ramsgate. Mary Whitty. Thomas Harris was our great grandmother’sgrandfather.

Upload your Story as a PDF as well as text and images about this Soldier

View Tributes Previous