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Messages from the Rest of World

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ Online Book for Brother James Kimpton https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/paddyhuntermurphyvolunteeratboysvillageinthe70sandformerpupilofstpetersschoolinbournemouth
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/paddyhuntermurphyvolunteeratboysvillageinthe70sandformerpupilofstpetersschoolinbournemouth

    Paddy Hunter-Murphy, volunteer at Boys' Village in the 70s and former pupil of St Peter's School in Bournemouth

    UK | 9 Jan 2018

     

    In September 1977, just after leaving St Peter's School in Bournemouth, I arrived at Madurai airport to be greeted by this tall, elegant gentleman who gave me a big smile and said, "Follow me", which I did to his Bullet bike. After putting my stuff (including my guitar) into a car to be driven by one of his colleagues, James told me to "hop on" and for the next hour and a half I saw the country from a wonderful perspective! I thought he was the coolest guy on the planet!! I was only with him for ten months but what a man! I lived in a tiny one-room house close to his, we would get up at 6 am, breakfast was a papaya and some 'gruel', then we were out for the day - mainly to G Kallupatti - to either work together in the clinic (mainly healing sores) or to check on the houses being built. In the clinic his attitude was 'how hard can it be' and guided by a 'barefoot doctor manual' he just got on with the job, with me passing him everything from iodine (for the sores) to hydrogen peroxide (for the ears). When he learnt that I did Geography he tasked me to map out Kallupatti which I did over a few months. After a little while I did more on my own and enjoyed the morning walk across the padi fields from Boys' Village, across the river, to Kallupatti. And I also taught English to small groups of boys on my tiny veranda. The evenings brought a little bit of cool and we would chat about the books we were reading - James loved a good thriller! On special days the boys were allowed to swim in the well which was great fun - I had to join in! He was particular that I had some R&R and I went on visits to the nuns up in the hills and also to the Henry's lovely house outside Madurai. I even met up with an old colonel who had 'stayed on' in Kodaikanal when I discovered the delights of whiskey for the first time! In January 2016 I visited Boys' Village/RTU again and was completely taken away by the amazing work and the incredible people and was able to meet up with James one last time. James was about sacrifice, love, helping others and nurturing people - but he was also about having lots of fun - and this shone through every day. He was a truly great man - one of a kind - and I was very, very lucky to have known him. Rest in Peace - to the coolest guy on the planet!

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Messages from the Rest of World

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share a contribution page with you which has been created in the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$ Online Book for Brother James Kimpton https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/thomaswilliamstrusteeofrtuintheuk
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Kimpton/Contributions/Find/RestofWorld0/thomaswilliamstrusteeofrtuintheuk

    Thomas Williams, trustee of RTU in the UK

    UK | 15 Jan 2018

     

    I don’t remember meeting Brother James when I was a child (see entry from my parents, Tim and Elizabeth Williams), but after we left India when I was six, my parents talked about him frequently. We would occasionally receive letters in his beautiful handwriting, enclosed in envelopes with exotic looking stamps. When I was 17 I wrote to him myself asking if I could come to volunteer at Reaching the Unreached. I spent four months there, meeting a number of his long-term supporters (including David and Jo Cassidy, and I think Martin Henry). Much of the time however I was the only volunteer there, and spent most mealtimes with James, learning much about Tamil Nadu and India more generally. He was much more charming and perceptive than his gruff exterior suggested, and I saw how he would appraise situations carefully, and carefully decide how to act. In later years I learnt from the people around him how his decisiveness and forcefulness, once he had decided on a course of action, could upset others who disagreed with his approach. However it often seemed even those who felt most wounded maintained their respect (and often love) for him; the clarity of his moral compass was clear. For me he remains a reminder that in complex situations there are better and worse approaches and answers; that the decisions that we take matter; and of the importance of humility, compassion and understanding. Thomas Williams Trustee of RTU in the UK

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