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A tribute to Captain William Robert Clayton by Oasis Academy Couldson

Date added: 12 Jun 2015

200

Oasis Academy Couldson

Schools Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/SchoolsWaterloo/Celebrations/FindTribute/WaterlooSoldiers/oasisa
Dear Family and Friends, As a way remembering those that fought at Waterloo in June 1815 including $personFirstName$, our school has created a page within the $bookTitle$. Please contribute by adding your thoughts, messages, photographs or even videos about this soldier. Add your insight or expertise to help build and lock-in our knowledge about this person, simply go to: $findPersonLink$. and make your contribution too. Thank you,

 Lord Uxbridge's Artificial Leg

The artificial leg was made for Henry Paget, Lord Uxbridge, whocommanded the British cavalry at the Battle of Waterloo.. He was hit on the right knee by a canister shot, after the missile had passed over the neck of Wellington’s horse, Copenhagen. According to anecdote, when his leg was hit he exclaimed, "By God, sir, I've lost my leg!", to which Wellington replied "By God, sir, so you have!"

He was carried off the field by his faithful aide-de-camp, Captain Horace Seymour and some soldiers of the Hanoverian army. He bravely suffered an above-knee amputation. This was carried out by Dr Hume, Wellington’s personal physician at the farm of Maison Tremblant in Waterloo village. The severed leg of the Marquess of Anglesey (as he became after the battle) was a notorious tourist attraction for years after the battle, while Paget himself suffered prolonged pain from the stump and the wound did not heal until 1816.This artificial leg is of far better quality than most amputees would receive. Many leg prostheses were made of wood, some just ‘peg legs’. A few were constructedof metal and had locking hinges, so that the knee could be bent or fixed straightas needed.

This leg however is a finely constructed product, replacing a simpler‘clapper leg’ (as it made a clapping sound on walking!) that was fashioned forPaget by the limb maker, James Potts of Chelsea. Patented as the ‘AngleseyLeg’, it was commercially advertised until 1914. Carved from fruitwood, the limb articulated and was controlled by prepared kangaroo tendon strips, so that as the knee bent, the foot flexed up at the ankle, thus preventing the toe scatching on the cobbled streets.

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A tribute to Captain William Robert Clayton by Oasis Academy Couldson

Date added: 12 Jun 2015

201

Oasis Academy Couldson

Schools Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/SchoolsWaterloo/Celebrations/FindTribute/WaterlooSoldiers/oasisa6
Dear Family and Friends, As a way remembering those that fought at Waterloo in June 1815 including $personFirstName$, our school has created a page within the $bookTitle$. Please contribute by adding your thoughts, messages, photographs or even videos about this soldier. Add your insight or expertise to help build and lock-in our knowledge about this person, simply go to: $findPersonLink$. and make your contribution too. Thank you,

British light cavalry sword

The purpose of the Cavalry sword was to serve as a superlight weapon that could serve also as a direction pointer for a troop of cavalry. The cavalryman's jobs often included job finding out where the enemy was and give warning if enemy soldiers were coming.

The sword and scabbard are made of steel. The handle is wood covered with leather and steel wire. This gave the sword better grip and would help when the sword was covered in blood. The sword and scabbard are made of steel, this meant that the sword was able to clean cut and was not too heavy for the soldiers.

Captain William Robert Clayton would have used this artefact as a use of weapon during the battle of Waterloo. It would have served as a light, efficient weapon. He would have used the artefact also as a direction point for the horses in the regiment. The first sword he would have used would have been this one as he could tell his men where to go and also it could be used as an efficient cavalry sword.

In addition, the straight-bladed sword was used in full dress by all three regiments of horse during the Waterloo period and continued to be used by officers of the 2nd Life Guards (such as Captain Clayton) well into the 1830s.

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