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Private Matthew Andrews

Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Celebrations/Find?celebrationsSectionName=DescendantsStories&name=matthewa

of 3rd BATTALION ROYAL SCOTS

Captain C.S. Hopkin's Company No.10.

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Submitted by: Kelso Yuill

Date added: 9 Feb 2015

Matthew Andrews, my great great grandfather enlisted at Edinburgh in the 1st Regt. of Foot, The Royal Scots, in October 1807 for a bounty of 11 guineas. After spells at Dunbar, then Chelmsford he was transferred from the 4th to the 3rd battalion in Portugal, June 1810. He was awarded the Military General Service Medal for his time in the Peninsula, with bars for Vitoria, San Sebastian, Nive and Nivelles. The battalion returned to Fermoy in Ireland. August 1814.
After 7 years his term expired Nov. 1814 but he re-enlisted for a second bounty, £5-8-4d. In May 1815 the battalion was posted to Brusselles via Cork and Ostend as part of Picton’s 5th Division. Miraculously he survived Quatre Bras and Waterloo unscathed.
When the 3rd Btn. was reduced 24th April 1817 at Chatham he transferred to the 1st Btn. in Ireland. From 1821 to 1827 he was on recruiting duties in Scotland, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Hamilton and finally Stirling where he was discharged 2nd July 1827, after 19 years, 295 days “, in consequence of length of service and worn out”. By then he had acquired a wife and two small children. He left Stirling with one pound, being 20 days pay plus twelve shillings and ten and a half pence, marching money for himself and family.
With a pension of one shilling a day he settled near Airdrie, Lanarkshire, and worked as a labourer in an Iron Works for a while. He died 30th May 1853. One branch of the family holds his M.G.S. medal but his Waterloo medal has not been traced.

Submitted by Kelso Yuill Scotland
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