Page of

Share this page

Share this page

Share this page

Share this page

Private Richard Hughes

Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Celebrations/Find?celebrationsSectionName=DescendantsStories&name=richardhughes

of Palmerston, Dublin

Captain Robert Dudgeon's Company No.8.

1 Jan 1790 - 10 Dec 1877

Upload your Story as a PDF as well as text and images about this Soldier

Dear Family and Friends, As a way remembering those that fought at Waterloo in June 1815 including $personFirstName$, we have created a page within the $bookTitle$ book. Please contribute by adding your thoughts, messages, photographs or even videos about this soldier. Add your insight or expertise to help build and lock-in our knowledge about this person, simply go to: $findPersonLink$ and make your contribution too. Thank you,
View Tributes Next

Submitted by: Neil Harrison

Date added: 13 Jun 2015

Richard Hughes, 1stFoot:

• Born in Palmerston, Dublin

• Private, 1st Foot, 2nd July. 1811Where Richard Hughes served:

• 21st June 1813 Vittoria - Wellington defeats King Joseph Bonaparte. 

• 31st August 1813 at St Sebastian. 2nd siege of St Sebastian, at which he was taken prisoner. The muster rolls confirm his absence as a prisoner in the period 25 July to 24 September 1813

• 16th June 1815 at Quatre Bras. The 3rd Batt. of the Royal Scots, which was reduced in 1817,and distinguished itself in a particular manner at Quatre Bras. "Being removed from the centre of the 5th Division, it charged and routed a column of the enemy. It was then formed in a square to receive the cavalry, and though repeated attacks were made, not the slightest impression was produced. Wherever the lancers and cuirassiers presented themselves they found a stern and undismayed front which they vainly endeavoured to penetrate".Mudford's Historical Account of the Campaign In the Netherlands, in 1815.

• 18th June 1815 at Waterloo. The 3rd Battalion, 1st Foot (Royal Scots), suffered very heavy casualties of 362 officers and men at Quatre Bras and Waterloo; in fact no Regiment suffered higher casualties amongst its officers, as a percentage, than the Royal Scots, in killed and wounded. Richard Hughes served at Waterloo in Captain Robert Dudgeon’s Company No 8 and was severely wounded in the battle.

• He served 6 years 238 days, including two years for Waterloo and was discharged on 24 February 1816, in consequence of 'a wound in the thigh received at Waterloo on the 18th day of June 1815.'

• Richard Hughes was discharged to an Out-pension at Chelsea Hospital on 20 March 1 81 6, and admitted to an In-pension at the Royal Kilmainham, Dublin, on 1 July 1854. He died there on 10 December 1877, and lies buried in the Private Soldiers Burial Ground.

Next Previous