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Private Henman Wainford

Waterloo 200
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Celebrations/Find?celebrationsSectionName=DescendantsStories&name=henmanwainford

of 1st (or KING's) DRAGOON GUARDS

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Submitted by: Adrian Waynforth

Date added: 26 May 2015

Private Hinman Wainford  1st Kings Dragoon Guards Born Stowmarket, Suffolk, 1774, from a family of blacksmiths, his unusual name is a combination of Henry and Inman. Christened Inman, his great grandmother’s surname; Henry was his father’s name. The Henry was perhaps added to distinguish him from his uncle Inman, my many times great grandfather. In Michael Mann’s book ‘And They Rode On’ he is named as Henry, and in his discharge papers as Hinman. He was illiterate and signed his discharge papers with an x. Hinman enlisted at Ipswich on 9th November 1793, aged 19 years and was discharged at Hamilton on 27th December 1818 having seen action at Cateau in 1794 and Waterloo in 1815. At Waterloo the Kings Dragoon Guards were attached to the Household Cavalry, the 530 sabres of the KDG made up made up nearly 40% of the total, and were placed at the centre of the front rank. The four squadrons of KDG passed either side of La Haye Sainte and helped charge the main French gun battery putting 40 guns out of action. Over enthusiasm meant many of the KDG chased the French cuirassiers too far and were caught out by French lancers. At 3.30pm Marshal Ney himself led 43 squadrons of French cavalry on La Haye Sainte and the British Infantry squares. At 4.15p.m. they were met by a second charge of the Household Cavalry Brigade. The KDG, now better disciplined, charged a total of around a dozen times. By 6p.m. the four regiments of the Household Brigade were reduced to 100 sabres in total, led by Captain Naylor of the KDG, the most senior officer left in the field. They were merged with the Union Brigade, which itself had only one squadron left from three regiments, and reinforced by a squadron of the 23rd Light Dragoons. At 7pm Naylor was injured and Lord Somerset’s combined Household and Union Brigade had been reduced from seven regiments to about 100 men and horses. Nonetheless, they took part in the final general advance and eventually spent the night where the French Old Guard had made its last stand. Today this spot is marked by the monument of the Dying Eagle. The KDG’s casulaties were high, 129 killed and 134 wounded (50% of the total) and only 20 fit to fight at the end of the battle. Hinman’s discharge papers say he was 5 feet 9 3/4 inches tall, with brown hair grey eyes and of fair complexion. His conduct was excellent and he received an extra 2 years pension for his part at Waterloo. At Waterloo he served in number 1 troop and I’d be interested in any more details of that troop in the battle. Hinman retired to Leeds and his wife Hannah died there in 1826. Their daughter Jane had been born in Arundel, Sussex, in 1804 and married Joseph Woodward in Leeds on 1st January 1828. Two months later Henry Ilman (Inman) Wainford died, aged 55. His Waterloo medal came up for auction in 2007. I’m pleased it’s survived but wish I had known of the auction so I could have brought the medal back into the family. Adrian Waynforth
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