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Waterloo 200 Anniversary Anecdotes

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share an anecdote about Waterloo 200 with you from the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$, add your own anecdote and share it with others. Waterloo 200 https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Contributions/Find/WaterlooAnecdotes/williamp
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Contributions/Find/WaterlooAnecdotes/williamp

    William Paterson

    | 9 Mar 2015

     

    “NAPOLEON” Visiting the Waterloo Memorial in early 1950, my mother told me about her ancestor, a private Fyffe of the 42nd Highlanders who was captured at Quatre Bras, he seemingly was a small young man about 5 feet tall and had been captured by some Imperial Guardsmen, who made fun of his small stature, he was returned to the Highlanders some days later dressed in a French drummer boys uniform, where he was nicknamed Napoleon for the rest of his life! William Paterson

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Waterloo 200 Anniversary Anecdotes

  • Dear Friends/Family, I would like to share an anecdote about Waterloo 200 with you from the $bookTitle$ book. To view the page please click on the following link: $findContributionLink$, add your own anecdote and share it with others. Waterloo 200 https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Contributions/Find/WaterlooAnecdotes/kennethmactaggart
    https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/Waterloo/Contributions/Find/WaterlooAnecdotes/kennethmactaggart

    Kenneth MacTaggart

    | 9 Mar 2015

     

    After the Battle - Perthshire, summer 1816 Janet Livingstone (nee MacGregor) was my great-great-great grandmother, and she relayed the following story to my grandmother Kirsty MacPhedran and my great-Uncle Hugh MacPhedran. Her memory, as a little girl living in a remote cottage in rural Perthshire, was of a steady trickle of starving men passing the door, and her mother leaving out bowls of milk for those who passed when the family were asleep. She said these were the remnants of the Highlanders who had fought at Waterloo, as the army was paid off in London and they had to walk home. Their pay was meagre, with deductions rather harshly imposed for equipment lost in battle. As the army stayed in occupation of Brussels for a year, their passage after walking more than 400 miles from the capital would have been in the autumn of 1816. Janet died in 1916 at Cairndow, Loch Fyne, at an age stated conservatively on her Death Certificate as 103 years, but believed to be older. That would have her aged three in 1816. We know from earlier Census records that she sometimes declared her age to be younger than she really was, so a year after Waterloo she may easily have been aged 4 or 5, making her recollection plausible. Her great-grandson Hugh MacPhedran lived almost to the age of 91, so it took just one single oral transmission to convey this story from 1816 to 1999, when Hugh died. Dr Kenneth MacTaggart

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