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Mr Charles Sherred

the RAF Benevolent Fund
https://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/rafbf/Celebrations/Find?celebrationsSectionName=RemembrancePages&name=charlessherred
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Dear Friends/Family, I have recently set up a page in the RAF Benevolent Fund Memorial Book and wanted to share it with you. Through this page we can share memories, photographs and videos of $personFirstName$ as well as raise money for the RAF Benevolent Fund. To view page and add your memories, just click on the following link: $findPersonLink$ Thanks!
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Remembered by: Charlie Nethercott

Date added: 21 May 2013

Charlie volunteered for the RAF in 1940 and was posted to India with the transport section after being transferred from being in bomber command. Soon he was posted to Burma to defend it from the Japanese.

This was a completely alien environment for all the young airmen. They lay down at night on roll up beds, often in mud infested with snakes, mosquitos with a host of extraordinary creatures, with stinging scorpions hiding in their boots in the mornings!

Conditions were very primitive and they were quite often hungry, but he did mention that if the monkeys, which were everywhere, ate a fruit, it was safe for the men to eat too! But there were not only monkeys in the trees, sometimes the Japanese would be silently sitting waiting to fire at them.

Then he had another posting. For a week the men were blindfolded which would acclimatise their sight ready for their next job, transporting convoys of lorries in the dark, and of course with no lights, often over mountain jungle roads or tracks.

Charlie was also at the fall of Singapore. They were told to 'Run for it - every man for himself.' Some of them commandeered a boat which was torpedoed, so they were forced to swim for the shore. They had to run for it, and Charlie kept running for a week to get away from the enemy.

There were no letters from home for him. He was the youngest of nine children, his Mother had died when he was three. His Father had been killed in an accident at home whilst Charlie was serving overseas.

We must remember forever these brave, yet cheerful boys, who gave us our freedom. Most, like Charlie, who served out there for five long years.

Charlie and I (A WAAF for three and a half years) married in 1950, and have a Son, and Daughter and five grandchildren. Charlie sadly past away on November 23rd, 2012 at the age of 89.
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